Careers

Your Future in Information or Museum Studies

A UofT iSchool education will open many doors for you and can lead to rewarding careers. You will acquire and develop valuable knowledge and skills with which you can join an established organization or become an entrepreneur.

In many instances, the identical professional skill set matches a wide variety of job titles and duties, as individual employers are crafting roles to suit their particular needs. The general skills that can be fostered include:

Intellectual Skills
 
Critical thinking
Research skills
Assessment and analysis
Commitment to continuous learning
Understanding of current and emerging technologies
 
Creativity & Communication Skills
Flexibility
Adaptability
Innovative problem solving
Presenting ideas clearly
Effective oral communication skills
Effective written communication skills
Leadership Skills
 
Interpersonal skills
Planning & organizing
Managing resources & services
Ability to work cooperatively
Project Management
User perspective approach
Customer service orientation
Team work in multicultural environments

MASTER OF MUSEUM STUDIES

Careers for the new breed of Museum professional

The proliferation of new digital technologies is changing the museum profession and the traditional notion of museums. Today, museums are found in many shapes and sizes, physical or virtual, large or small, from heritage sites, to interactive science centres, private galleries, virtual exhibits and many other forms. The responsibilities of museum professionals are as diverse as these innovative places.  Bright, creative and technologically-savvy museum professionals will be the ones to educate and tell stories in new and exciting ways, and create unique memorable experiences.

FOR STUDENTS
FOR EMPLOYERS FOR ALUMNI

MASTER OF INFORMATION
DOCTORATE IN INFORMATION STUDIES

Satisfy the growing demand for Information professionals

Information is everywhere. From books to blogs, from corporate records to social media, people and organizations are producing, sharing, storing, accessing and analyzing information every day. Gartner Research is predicting data to grow by 800% over the next 5 years, and most of it will be “unstructured data”, such as emails, texts, videos, audio, and log data. Skilled people are needed to manage, organize and make sense of the vast quantity and quality of information for present and future users. Information professionals, who know how to leverage technology and efficiently relate information to their business and colleagues, are best suited to fill the growing need.

FOR STUDENTS
FOR EMPLOYERS FOR ALUMNI

CONCURRENT REGISTRATION OPTION (CRO): MI/MMSt

Combine the knowledge of the museum and heritage sector and of managing information.

According to the Committee on Libraries, Archives and Museums (CALM), established by the American Library Association (ALA), there is large interest in collaboration, convergence and joint standards among these institutions. Overlapping roles and integrated access to collections are good reasons for such partnerships. Museums cannot be imagined without websites and its increasinly common to have  collections digitally recorded in a database or information system.

The use of interactive kiosks, 3D technology, mobile apps and the latest digital tools is growing as museums are integrating technology in all aspects of their operations. At the annual conference “Museums and the Web”, presentations on “user experience design in web museums”, “museum informatics” and “digital curation” are further uncovering this trend. Big data is a hot topic in information and museum fields, while conversations about usability, access to information, crowdsourcing, cloud computing, and digital preservation are gaining more

© 2014 University of Toronto, Faculty of Information
140 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3G6
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